April is the time of year when northern hemisphere gardeners sort through their treasure trove of seeds from last year to figure out which seeds they need to buy to replenish their stock for the gardening season. If you’re a typical gardener, some seeds have a longer shelf life than others. You can store them for a few seasons…but where?

My seeds are stored in a metal lunch box I can easily tote with me in my garden sojourns. I keep the seeds in their original packages when possible. Seeds saved from past harvests are stored in marked envelopes that used to house greeting cards or empty pill bottles. I keep a pen and a small roll of masking tape in the lunch box for last minute changes.

Some people store their seeds in buckets or baskets, but the squirrels in my area don’t allow me to be that trusting with these devices. These containers must be stored inside far from rodent attention.

Storing your seeds inside gives the seed harvester far more flexibility. As long as your seeds are protected from light and moisture, your only limit is your imagination. Some people use cd holders to organize their seeds. Seed packets slip nicely into cd sleeves. It really just depends on the resources you have available. The advantage of the cd folder is it can be stored with your garden books on your book shelf.

Another friend stores her seeds in a metal mailbox she has posted at the entrance to her garden. Some of her seeds need to be frozen (such as echinacea) before they can sprout. Leaving them in baby food jars overwinter in a mailbox does the trick nicely without taking up valuable freezer space.

Seed Storage ideas:

  • Lunch box
  • Bucket or Basket
  • CD or Card Organizers and Holders
  • Mailbox near the barden

There is no wrong way to store seeds as long as they’re safe and accessible. Look to your resources and grab a shovel. Spring has sprung!