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Cloche

Garden Cloches: How To Make a Recycled Mini-Greenhouse

Spring weather in the Willamette Valley is unpredictable. It can be warm enough to fool you into planting tomato starts in the morning and cold enough for snow by the afternoon. A well placed garden cloche can be the difference between life and death for tender transplants. Even people with the good fortune to have their own greenhouse can benefit from cloches.
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Creating the Snail-Free Garden: All-Natural Tips for the Organic Gardener

Gardens are full of life. Some of that life, like the snail population, isn't good for the garden.The biggest snail invader in Oregon gardens is the Brown Garden Snail, which was originally imported to San Francisco in the 1850s for escargot. This tiny menace can denude a tray of unsuspecting tomato starts in one night. The organic gardener has several effective tools available for defense that are not only safe for pets and children but are also good for the garden.
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Easy Tips for Deer-Proofing Your Garden

Deer are graceful creatures to observe in natural settings. The romance wears off when you see the damage they've raked through your flower beds. As human habitation spreads more thickly, the deer's natural predators are being forced out, leaving our vegetarian garden predators in paradise--no enemies and plenty of well tended delicacies lovingly arranged for optimum dining. Deer particularly appreciate expensive, pampered plants like roses, turning the joys of gardening into an unpleasant war for the gardener.
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Sweetgum

Sweet Gum Seed Pods as Slug and Snail Repellant

November and December are the time to gather organic slug and snail deterrent for next summer's garden. Autumn winds will have rattled the sweetgum trees and loosened their spiky seed pods to the ground. Homeowners are obliged to rake them up from walkways and lawns as they can trip up pedestrians. Why not save them to protect tender seedlings? Sweetgum trees are native to the southeastern states but are planted in Oregon as an ornamental landscape tree. The lovely five-pointed leaves turn red, orange, and burgundy in autumn. The seed pods, given unpleasant names such as "ankle turners" and "porcupine eggs," are problems for landowners. They cause lumps in the lawn as they don't decay quickly. These troublesome sticklers are treasures for organic gardens.
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